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Channing Tatum Says Gambit Will NOT Be in X-Men: Apocalypse

Source: ScreenRant

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Channing Tatum Confirms GAMBIT Movie Will Be an Origin Story

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Magic Mike XXL is Stripped of Story & Style

Three years ago, Channing Tatum and Steven Soderbergh’s passion project, Magic Mike hit theaters and became an instant hit. Loosely based on Tatum’s real-life experience as a male stripper, the movie earned over $167 million, off the small budget of only $7 million. So, it is no surprise that a sequel would be made, eventually. Magic Mike XXL is directed by Gregory Jacobs, the first film’s producer and assistant director.

Joe Manganiello and Channing Tatum in Magic Mike XXL

Joe Manganiello and Channing Tatum in Magic Mike XXL

Magic Mike XXL follows Mike (Channing Tatum), who after three years out of the stripper life, rejoins the remaining Kings of Tampa and hit the road for a last blow-out show in Myrtle Beach.

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Jupiter Ascending Descends to Disaster

In 1999, the world was introduced to Neo—The One. If that name doesn’t ring a bell, hopefully the title, The Matrix, will. That’s right, it has been nearly 16 years since the Wachowski Siblings introduced the world to one of the most recognizable action movies off all-time. Going forward their names would always be held in high regard, but unfortunately the siblings have never reached the heights of their earlier films. However, now the siblings bring their new space opera, Jupiter Ascending, to the big screen hoping to surprise and entertain fans like just they did in 1999.

Channing Tatum and Mila Kunis in Jupiter Ascending

Channing Tatum and Mila Kunis in Jupiter Ascending

Jupiter Ascending follows the story of Jupiter Jones (Mila Kunis), a poor caretaker, who discovers that humans are not alone on this planet. She learns this from a genetically engineered hunter by the name of Caine (Channing Tatum), who explains to her that she is next in line for an extraordinary inheritance because of her genetic signature—Earth.

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Foxcatcher Wrestles with Emotions

At one point in Bennett Miller’s poignant and powerful Foxcatcher, John du Pont declares the importance of a coach, “A coach is a father, a coach is a mentor, a coach has great power on an athlete’s life”. While these words definitely sum up what your typical coach/athlete relationship is like, this film does more than enough to separate itself from the traditional sports drama. In this moment, this quote really sums up du Pont’s greatest delusion. Foxcatcher is a chilling tale of people hoping for greatness. They desire to be heroes, winners, and champions, but in the end no matter how much they give they feel like it will never be their best. This constant feeling of failure looms large for du Pont and his athlete, Mark Schultz, and it is ultimately the start of their own self-hatred. Led by terrific performances by the three leads Steve Carell, Channing Tatum, and Mark Ruffalo, Bennett Miller has created one of the best films of the year that shows you the pain of two disturbed and lost individuals.

Steve Carell in Foxcatcher

Steve Carell in Foxcatcher

Foxcatcher, which is based on true events, follows the unlikely relationship between Olympic Gold Medal winning wrestler, Mark Schultz (Channing Tatum), and the multi-millionaire heir to the du Pont estate, John du Pont (Steve Carell). When John du Pont invites Mark to his estate in order to offer him the chance to prepare and train for the 1988 Seoul Olympics, Mark eagerly accepts the offer. The two develop a special relationship that is driven by the need to win. Mark hopes to step out of his brother’s (Mark Ruffalo) shadow, and du Pont is motivated by wanting to be respected by all, especially his disapproving mother. However, their relationship soon turns toxic and not even winning Gold can prevent a tragic outcome.

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The Book of Life

In February of 2012, a film called “Day of the Dead,” was going to be produced by Guillermo del Toro. Later that year, the production company, Reel FX announced the film would be released in the beginning of October. One year later, and the company announces they are pushing the film back. However, it’s now October of 2014 and what is now called, “The Book of Life,” directed by Jorge Gutierrez, is here for the public to enjoy even from the afterlife.

Diego Luna and Zoe Saldana

Diego Luna and Zoe Saldana in “The Book of Life”

The movie tells the story of two friends, Manolo (Diego Luna) and Joaquín (Channing Tatum), who both are striving to live in the shadows of their families while fighting for the love of Maria (Zoe Saldana).

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22 Jump Street

With the critical and commercial success of their first buddy cop film, 21 Jump Street, and their impending sequel, Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill have now joined the ranks of previous duos who have starred in more than one buddy cop film. This newest duo are, of course, following the likes of the unlikely partnership of Murphy and Nolte, the crazy adventures of Gibson and Glover, the street smart Smith and Lawrence, and the odd pairing that is Chan and Tucker. The only questions that remain unanswered are how long with the bromance last between Tatum and Hill, and how long will it take the pair to outstay their welcome?

Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum in 22 Jump Street

Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum in 22 Jump Street

Following their success at bringing down a synthetic drug ring at a local high school, Officers Schmidt (Hill) and Jenko (Tatum) are back at it again. This time, they are going undercover at a local college to crack a case involving a new synthetic drug. Although the duo should be prepared for the same sort of challenge, Schmidt and Jenko fall into different crowds at the college, and they soon begin to question each other’s commitment to the case and their commitment to each other. Can Schmidt and Jenko pull together and work out their differences in time to solve the case, or will their immaturity be what finally breaks them up? 

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G.I. Joe: Retaliation

If I had to use one word to describe the movies of 2013, at least up this point, it would be—mediocracy. Every picture, seems to be nothing special, nor anything terrible. The films just seem to float at a comfortable average rating, and surprisingly G.I. Joe: Retaliation will join these other films of mediocracy. G.I. Joe: Retaliation is easily the biggest picture of 2013 so far, yet it, like the rest of the movies of the past three months, was just all right. Directed by Jon M. Chu, this movie follows G.I. Joe: The Rise of the Cobra (2009), which wasn’t a favorite of mine either. Four years later, comes an amped up sequel that only, kind-of, delivers.

Dwayne Johnson and Bruce Willis in G.I. Joe: Retaliation

Dwayne Johnson and Bruce Willis in G.I. Joe: Retaliation

Even though Cobra Commander (Luke Bracey) has been captured, that doesn’t mean the G.I. Joes are out of business. Roadblock (Dwayne Johnson) and Duke (Channing Tatum) lead the G.I. Joes in missions to help capture the remaining members of COBRA, as well as help secure world peace. After the mission to return a nuclear bomb, the imaginable happens. The G.I. Joes are all killed in the vicious attack, that could only be authorized by the President of the United States. The President (Jonathan Pryce) then label the G.I. Joe’s as traitors and claim them to be “no more.” However, only a handful of Joes survive, and now the must team up with the “original Joe,” General Joseph Colton (Bruce Willis) to get to the bottom of the attack and stop COBRA.

G.I. Joe: Retaliation kicks off right, with intense action, solid humor, and good chemistry between characters. However, somewhere during the near two hour film, everything goes wrong, and it just gets boring. To easily break it down, the first act was the best part of the film, the second act was just plain boring, and by the third act, I was so out of it, I didn’t care about what happens.  The problem was that there was a lot of things going on, that should have made it completely opposite of boring, but the energy is quickly lost in the first thirty minutes, leaving the rest of the movie bland and weak. Don’t get me wrong, the movie offered some great action sequences and some wonderful eye candy, but at the end of the day, I didn’t care about it, and I’m already starting to forget this highly anticipated sequel. Sure, seeing Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson fight and shoot huge gatling guns is awesome, but I was just more excited when the credits rolled. As my good friend always says, the credits of this movie were too far apart.

One element that genuinely surprised me, was how quickly I was attracted to Tatum and The Rock’s chemistry. The two’s relationship, seems to develop instantaneously, and they are great to see interact with each other onscreen. However, beyond that, there is only one really interesting performance. That is from the President, played by Jonathan Pryce. He plays two roles, and has to interact with himself multiple times, there is something highly entertaining about the villainous version of the President. Despite him, the movie didn’t offer any real strong performances. Dwayne Johnson, seemed to get old in the film, and didn’t offer much chemistry without Tatum. Even, one of my favorite action stars Bruce Willis didn’t offer anything strong enough to save G.I. Joe: Retaliation, but it was still enjoyable to see him. G.I. Joe: Retaliation promises audiences an excited action film, that will blow our minds, and it just doesn’t follow through. There are so many cool parts, or fascinating sequences or moments to concentrate on, yet everything in the middle is just weak and dull.

Though the movie was a mild disappointment, I can easily point out the best part of the picture. It was the showdown between the characters Storm Shadow and Snake Eyes. The battle of good and evil, and in their outfits’ case black and white. These two men completely steal the show and it is so highly entertaining to watch them fight. The two ninjas stand, in the classic duel form, of a small highway, and then hell ensues. It was the best part, not for the actual choreographed fighting (even though that was awesome too) but it had such chemistry. It was something that got the audience excited, and totally reeled them back in the picture after about twenty minutes of yawns. As Storm Shadow fires ninja stars at Snake Eyes, the movie becomes the film audience was waiting for—problem is the scene is about two minutes. The fight is followed by the highly advertised fight along the side of a mountain, which was equal fun and intense. It was different and just made G.I. Joe: Retaliation a more enjoyable experience. However, after that I just remember it getting boring again. G.I. Joe: Retaliation wasn’t by any means a terrible picture, and probably one of the better ones of this year, but it is one that I believe will be forgettable, just like G.I. Joe: The Rise of the Cobra (2009). In four years, if someone brings up G.I. Joe: Retaliation, I’m sure people will respond with, “I don’t remember” or “wait, which one was that,” and “the one when Snake Eyes and Storm Shadow had that awesome fight.” All G.I. Joe: Retaliation made me want to do was just revisit the animated series from the 1980s.

G.I. Joe: Retaliation had great moments of entertaining and intense action, but the middle was just boring and made it feel the movie just dragged on. I’ve been waiting for a G.I. Joe movie, but only get G.I. No & G.I. Schmo.

2 out of 4 stars

-By Jacob R. Tiranno

 

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Side Effects

The Oscars are about two weeks away, and everybody in Hollywood is gearing up for the “Super Bowl” of movies. The nominees are making their media rounds by showcasing their celebrated works, and the studio executives are quietly, or sometimes bombastically, promoting their cherished films. While this is going on, fans and pundits are closely following this Oscar campaign and are most realistically making his or her own predictions. This is no doubt a big part of the movie year every year, and rightfully so. However, this at times can be a little misleading and can be a distraction. In this case, while some fans are most likely trying to catch up by watching all of the Best Picture nominees, they are missing an end of an era of sorts.

Rooney Mara in Side Effects

Rooney Mara in Side Effects

Director Steven Soderbergh has been making movies consistently since 1989, and has gained a large group of admirers. He jumped on the movie scene and became a sensation with his directorial debut, Sex, Lies, and Videotapes. His work on this film garnished critical praise internationally as he became the youngest winner ever of the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival. Since then Soderbergh has not only developed a uniquely distinctive style, but also a diverse filmography. His filmography is impressive as it is daring and creative. It is filled with many different types of films, but they all contain artistic creativity and integrity. Soderbergh’s style is extremely versatile, which can be seen through the different genres he chooses to film. Soderbergh’s films are always filled with gripping dialogue and scenes, terrific acting, great musical sensibilities, and montages that are absolutely fresh. His films are also not restricted by any boundaries, but are more than willing to cross any boundaries or conventions if necessary. Soderbergh’s movies are also always well calculated, even though some films of his might throw us a wild curveball. Either way when you get a Soderbergh film, you are getting an entertaining film that manages to carry style without losing substance.

Most of us have seen a majority of his films. Wether it be Traffic, Erin Brockovich, Ocean’s 11 and its sequel, and most recently Contagion and Magic Mike. However, that all might come to an end as his latest effort could be his last theatrical release. Since 2011, Soderbergh has been hinting at retiring or at the very least taking a “directing sabbatical”. If this holds true, this week will have Soderbergh last film in theaters, although he is currently finishing up a HBO movie about Liberace. However, this explains the increase of Soderbergh movies in the past four years or so. Since 2009, Soderbergh has directed seven feature length films and one documentary. Some people might say this has hurt him artistically and his later works are not as impressive as his earlier works. While that might be true, it seems like Soderbergh is serious about taking a leave of absence from directing, and by doing so is capping off his filmography. I would argue he is doing a good job at finding the right material to end his career on, even though I might not be a fan of all of his latest works. What I would admit is that I respect his work effort and his commitment to his artistic voice. I would also like to add that with his potentially last effort, Soderbergh would leave off on a very strong note.

Side Effects follows Emily Taylor (Rooney Mara) as she is brutally dealing with her depression and coming to terms with her future. Emily is young, successful, beautiful, and is in a very loving marriage with Martin (Channing Tatum). Their life together is perfect and is about to even get better; however, as soon as happiness comes it painfully leaves. Martin is arrested for inside trading and is sent to prison for four years. Emily’s life is turned upside down, and depression overtakes her. Four years has passed, and Emily’s depression has become worse, but her commitment to Martin remains strong. Emily then decides to see psychiatrist, Dr. Jonathan Banks (Jude Law), who prescribes her a new drug that should change her life. However, Emily and Martin’s life becomes unraveled as Emily experiences unexpected side effects.

Side Effects is a truly gripping and brilliant film that will leave everybody on the edge of their seats. The movie quietly and elegantly takes the audience on a taught, provocative thriller that is filled with twists and turns. Steven Soderbergh has successfully created a picture that is as enjoyable as it is thrilling and exhilarating. The movie is perfectly filmed on digital video and offers crisp and fresh cinematography and sharp editing. The story is intelligent and not only offers a great character study of two separate characters, but also offers a tale that is clever and makes an intriguing commentary on the culture of medication and the pharmaceutical industry. The screenwriter, Scott Z. Burns, creates authentic and real characters that are all compelling in their own right. These characters stand out in the story that goes to places you are sure not to expect. Burns definitely creates a very clever thriller that is unpredictable at times. For it is entirety, Side Effects will have the audience fully engaged in the intelligent direction, story, magnetic score, and wonderful acting.

As noted earlier in this review, Soderbergh is without a doubt a very versatile director that is not restricted by certain conventions, but adds creativity to the conventions. Side Effects could have been easily one of the generic thrillers that offers up quick thrills and not much else. The film could also have easily rushed to the finish that will ultimately leave people unsatisfied. However, with Soderbergh at the helm, Side Effects becomes a memorable film that allows Soderbergh to artistically exhibit his style. The film is filled with such despair and hopelessness that even the city of New York looks dim and bleak. Especially in the first half, Soderbergh creates such a bland and bleak state that it adds to the film’s affect and makes the movie so much more poignant. This style adds to the feeling that some of the characters, especially Emily, feel disconnected in the cold world. The first half also quietly builds up the tension that will build throughout the movie. The pacing and build up of Side Effects is wonderful and as the film progresses the suspense intensifies. Soderbergh careful films harrowing scenes after harrowing scenes with his quick cuts, fast edits, and long shots. There is always something going on in the film, and in his camera movements Soderbergh might carefully hint at deception. Soderbergh’s style visually adheres to the depressed state that is confined to life of pain and suffering. However, at the same time Soderbergh manages to creatively film Side Effects in a Hitchcock way. After all these years, Soderbergh filmmaking is still inspired.

While the story and direction of Side Effects easily makes the film completely original and gripping, that acting is what will ultimately make you stay. That acting in the film is just marvelous and is great all around. The actors worth noting in the film are the lovely, talented Rooney Mara and the always good Jude Law. Both actors in their respective roles are outstanding and command the screen together. With each passing year, Rooney Mara proves to become better and better. She has definitely established herself as one of the best actresses of her age group, and with this film she will hopefully gain more notoriety and more leading roles. Mara is absolutely perfect in the role of Emily, and offers a compelling turn. She is emotionally present throughout the picture, and is phenomenal in the performance. Her performance is extremely genuine and so believable that you begin to have real concerns for her. I believe that Mara was perfect for the role and offers a performance that only she could have portrayed. Throughout the whole film, Mara’s Emily is so intriguing and so alluring that you can’t take your eyes off her. The same can be said of Jude Law in his role as Dr. Banks. Law’s Dr. Banks is such a likable character and a complex character that he is a character that you will like to know more about. Law holds his cards close to his chest, which makes you more interested in his motives. Law is the perfect balance to Mara and delivers just a strong performance.

Side Effects is a very good to a great thriller that offers unique directing, a captivating story, and sensational performances by Mara and Law. The film is a great showing of how potent a psychological thriller can be. Don’t research about the film, try not to watch too much trailers, just go see the movie, and I am sure you won’t be disappointed. In fact, the movie is still growing on me, and the more I think about it the more I like it. After watching the film, you are sure to have side effects, but in this case it might just be worth it.

The cast includes: Rooney Mara (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo), Jude Law (Contagion), Channing Tatum (Magic Mike), and Catherine Zeta-Jones (Broken City). The film was written by Scott Z. Burns (The Bourne Ultimatum) and directed by Steven Soderbergh (Magic Mike).

 

3.5 out of 4 stars.

 

-By Louie Coruzzolo

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21 Jump Street

Based on Patrick Hasburgh and Stephen J. Cannell’s 1987 television series sharing the same title, directors, Phil Lord and Chris Miller, bring a new take on 21 Jump Street. Written by Michael Bacall, who also joined Jonah Hill in creating the story, brings a fresh take on the typical action film. 21 Jump Street stars Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum, and Brie Larson. The film also stars Rob Riggle, Dave Franco, DeRay Davis, and Ice Cube.

Tatum and Hill in 21 Jump Street

 

Schmidt (Hill) wasn’t the most popular kid in high school, dubbed with the nickname ‘The Not-So SlimShady’ and when he fails at asking a girl to prom, Jenko (Tatum) doesn’t miss a beat by laughing in his face. However, the two will meet again, when they both join the police academy, and once they figure Schmidt’s brains with Jenko’s athletic ability make them a team that can’t be stopped, they graduate and become partners. However being bicycle cops aren’t fulfilling their action needs, and after a major screw-up, they are reassigned to Jump Street, where they find out they have to go undercover at their old stomping ground, high school.

 

21 Jump Street is a breathe of fresh air, as it does a remarkable job and poking fun at the stereotypes of high school, as well as remakes, and of course the action movie genre. The beauty of 21 Jump Street is the film doesn’t take itself to seriously, as it in the beginning laughs about the constant remakes and reboots going on in Hollywood, being it is one. The movie also takes time to joke about how they both look too old to pass for high school seniors, yet the film seems believable, and it’s an absolute blast. The movies aren’t the only thing 21 Jump Street attempts to tease, as it plays with the idea that because comic books and tolerance are accepted today, that the not-so cool kids of the past could be royalty in today’s high school. Tatum and Hill are a joy to watch on screen, though at first glance it may seem like an odd pairing, the two have outstanding chemistry, and make buddy-cops fun again. For audiences, most expected a hilarious performance from Hill, but most will be surprised with the performance from Tatum. Tatum hasn’t had the ideal filmography, but this picture truly gives Tatum’s time to shine, he’s comedic, keeps up with Hill, and together the two may make the funniest duo of the year. The comedy seems fresh, and new, yet spoofing the action genre has itself become a stereotype, however 21 Jump Street makes it seem to work, where movies like The Other Guys, failed at doing it so well. The film isn’t perfect, with many smalls things against it, such as a weak supporting cast, mediocre effects, and the story is somewhat predictable, but when the two are on screen, the audience gets what they want. For instance, when the two trip on a new drug, the scenes that follow are easily amusing, as Hill tries out track and field and Tatum decides to play the cymbals. Another great example, is when a large fight break out at a party the undercover cops throw, with Hill begging for help, as Tatum brings havoc, it just makes the film a pleasing, entertaining picture.

 

Hill and Tatum’s comedic chemistry ultimately makes 21 Jump Street, and it truly is, too cool for school.

 

3 out of 4 stars

 

– By Jacob R. Tiranno

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