Tag Archives: Entertainment

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows

1 out of 4 stars

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X-Men: Apocalypse Movie Review

2 out of 4 stars

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The Boss Movie Review

I, like most people, fell in love with Melissa McCarthy after watching her outrageous performance in the hit comedy Bridesmaids. I’ve called her the “One of the funniest women in Hollywood,” and to this day, I still believe this is true. However, just because I think she is funny, that doesn’t mean I find all of her work funny. Tammy and Identity Thief immediately come to mind. These films aren’t horrible, but in both of my reviews I talk about how the movies fail to reach the female, physical comedian’s potential, and now, I add another title to the mentioned list—The Boss.

Kristen Bell & Melissa McCarthy in The Boss

Kristen Bell & Melissa McCarthy in The Boss

The Boss is directed by McCarthy’s husband, Ben Falcone, who has been a creative force in the majority of her work. They make a great team, but unfortunately, they don’t always make great movies. See, before seeing this film, I argued that McCarthy was on the fast track of being type-casted. She usually plays the role of an eccentric character either a slob or in this case a wealthy snob. But, after seeing her newest picture, I realized it’s not her being typecast as much as her movies (the ones she or her husband are in creative control of) follow the same formula.

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Demolition Movie Review

Demolition is the new film from Oscar-nominated director, Jean-Marc Vallée. It tells the story of Davis Mitchell (Jake Gyllenhaal), an investment banker, whose wife recently died in a tragic car accident. Instead of mourning her death, Davis questions their relationship. “I don’t think I knew who she was,” he tells an acquaintance. This thought launches Davis into a self-created mission to find out more about his wife and more importantly, himself.

Jake Gyllenhaal in Demolition

Jake Gyllenhaal in Demolition

Firstly, I find it quite odd that Demolition comes after Vallée’s incredible film, Wild. The 2014 drama, starring Reese Witherspoon, was an emotionally rich journey of a character trying to find inner peace. It is a nearly perfect character study, displaying a person’s road to self-revelation. So, when the filmmaker returns to tell a very similar story, it’s interesting that it is so unsuccessful in doing the same. Wild is a more complete, efficient work, whereas Demolition feels overfilled. It opens up a lot of storylines, only to never close them or even revisit them.

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Eye in the Sky Film Review

3.5 out of 4 stars

Watch Jacob Tiranno review the new thriller EYE IN THE SKY below:

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Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

**The following review doesn’t reveal any Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice spoilers except a brief synopsis and some details revealed in the trailers **

Ever since Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice was announced at the 2013 San Diego Comic Con, the world has been waiting to see the battle of a lifetime. Nearly three years later, people can now see the Dark Knight go one on one with the Man of Steel on the silver screen for the first time, thanks to director Zack Snyder. Snyder, in a way, has been chosen to lead Warner Bros. with their DC Comics film series. He directed this movie’s predecessor Man of Steel (2013), and will direct the upcoming Justice League films as well as produce Suicide Squad, The Flash, and Aquaman. It’s an interesting choice based on the fact that Snyder is quite the polarizing filmmaker; many critics and fans haven’t approved his work in some time. In fact, Man of Steel was met with a lot of criticism, hence why they didn’t make another solo Superman movie. Instead, they had to add Batman because he is a box office draw. Regardless, this is the beginning of what is to come from DC and Warner Bros., and the tone will be set by Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.

Ben Affleck (Batman) goes face to face with Henry Cavill (Superman) in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

Ben Affleck (Batman) goes face to face with Henry Cavill (Superman) in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

 

The movie follows the final events from Man of Steel when Superman (Henry Cavill) battle with General Zod (Michael Shannon) nearly destroyed everything in sight in the city of Metropolis. However, the audience is given a different perspective in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. We see the events through the eyes of Bruce Wayne (Ben Affleck), who sees his building destroyed, in which some of his employees perish during the brawl. Wayne (who is secretly the Batman) now believes Superman is a force that has to be dealt with, because though he is seemingly doing good, he could “burn this whole place down” and the world would have to watch.

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My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 Film Review

In 2002, director Joel Zwick and writer Nia Vardalos taught the world just how loud and large a Greek wedding can be with their hit movie, My Big Fat Greek Wedding. It remains the highest grossing romantic comedy of all-time, even though it never reached the number one spot at the box office. The film has earned over 368 million dollars worldwide, on the small budget of only five million dollars. With that type of success, nobody was surprised when My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2  was announced, even if it was 14 years later.

Nia Vardalos and John Corbett in My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2

Nia Vardalos and John Corbett in My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2

 My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 continues the story of Toula Portokalos (Vardalos) and her huge, sometimes very needy Greek family. Only this time, she’s trying to balance multiple parts of her life, including, dealing with her daughter who wants to go to college out of state and the lack of romance with her husband. But that’s not all, the entire Portokalos now have to ban together to arrange a wedding when they learn Toula’s parents, Gus (Michael Constantine) and Maria (Lainie Kazan), were never officially married.

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The Divergent Series: Allegiant

Watch as Jacob Tiranno reviews The Divergent Series: Allegiant. To watch more video reviews go to www.youtube.com/chasingcinema

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10 Cloverfield Lane Movie Review

Watch as Jacob Tiranno reviews 10 Cloverfield Lane. To watch more video reviews go to www.youtube.com/chasingcinema

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13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi

13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi, which is based on the Mitchell Zuckoff’s book 13 Hours: The Inside Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi, follows the tragic death of American Ambassador, Chris Stevens. Stevens was killed on September 11, 2012, during an attack at the United States Consulate in Benghazi, and now a security team made up of men from different military branches have to defend their base and try to piece together how this was allowed to happened.

John Krasinski in 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi

John Krasinski in 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi

It is genuinely hard to critique a film like 13 Hours. No matter how bad or good it may be, at the back of your mind sits the acknowledgment that the events that are depicted on screen have actually occurred. The objectives of war films like 13 Hours and recently Lone Survivor and American Sniper are to remind us that these are the true stories of brave men and women fighting for our country. And in the last 15 minutes of 13 Hours, the movie hits its goal in stride as it bridges the pain and emotions felt by the characters to their real life counterparts. This is when the movie is at its most honest and impactful. After watching nonstop combat for mostly the entire duration of the film, and seeing the pictures of the very men who the characters are based on, the movie stops being an action spectacle and briefly becomes a sincere tribute to those men depicted in the film. Unfortunately, these emotions are not always present.

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