Tag Archives: Jake Gyllenhaal

Demolition Movie Review

Demolition is the new film from Oscar-nominated director, Jean-Marc Vallée. It tells the story of Davis Mitchell (Jake Gyllenhaal), an investment banker, whose wife recently died in a tragic car accident. Instead of mourning her death, Davis questions their relationship. “I don’t think I knew who she was,” he tells an acquaintance. This thought launches Davis into a self-created mission to find out more about his wife and more importantly, himself.

Jake Gyllenhaal in Demolition

Jake Gyllenhaal in Demolition

Firstly, I find it quite odd that Demolition comes after Vallée’s incredible film, Wild. The 2014 drama, starring Reese Witherspoon, was an emotionally rich journey of a character trying to find inner peace. It is a nearly perfect character study, displaying a person’s road to self-revelation. So, when the filmmaker returns to tell a very similar story, it’s interesting that it is so unsuccessful in doing the same. Wild is a more complete, efficient work, whereas Demolition feels overfilled. It opens up a lot of storylines, only to never close them or even revisit them.

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Everest Movie Review & Film Summary

I walked out of Everest failing to understand why anyone would ever want to climb a mountain. That being said, I respect any brave soul who’s done it. I just don’t know why they did it or why they’d want to. After seeing this picture, I learned the painful consequences of taking on such a feat. I guess that is what makes reaching the summit of a mountain so powerful, most people just aren’t mentally or physically equipped to do it. Nonetheless, Everest, was an extremely effective movie that gave me an experience too close to the real thing.

Jake Gyllenhaal in Everest

Jake Gyllenhaal in Everest

 The film takes place in 1996, and tells the story of two expeditions, Mountain Madness and Adventure Consultants, that plan to climb the earth’s highest mountain. The two-hour movie follows these expeditions, lead by Rob Hall (Jason Clarke) and Scott Fischer (Jake Gyllenhaal), as they ascent toward the summit of Mount Everest. However, these valiant climbers are about encounter a deadly storm they didn’t see coming. The film was directed by Baltasar Kormákur.

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Southpaw Movie Review & Film Summary

Like most boxing movies, Southpaw, isn’t about boxing. It is about a self-destructive man. A man embodied with rage and completely blind to the world around him. The movie itself is a boxing match, not for the characters on screen, but for the audience. The film forces viewers to go twelve emotional rounds, with both ups and downs, receiving gut-punch after gut-punch.

Forest Whitaker and Jake Gyllenhaal in Southpaw

Forest Whitaker and Jake Gyllenhaal in Southpaw

Southpaw, directed by Antoine Fuqua, tells the story of professional boxer Billy Hope (Jake Gyllenhaal) who after the loss of his wife (Rachel McAdams), hits rock bottom. Shortly after, he loses his daughter (Oona Laurence) because of his reckless behavior. Now, Billy must work his way back from nothing to regain not only his self-worth but his daughter.

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SOUTHPAW Official Trailer #2 Review

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EVEREST Official Trailer #1 Review

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Nightcrawler

Within the opening minutes of the film, a desperate yet determined Louis Bloom states his motto to a potential employer: “If you want to win the lottery, you have to make the money to buy the ticket.” While these words might get overlooked thanks to the playful manner in which Bloom states it, this motto goes onto speak volumes about the moral ambiguity that lies ahead. “Nightcrawler” is a brilliant and unsettling character study of a man that is as twisted as he is persistent. As the film progresses, we get to see the disturbing transformation that Bloom undergoes. Bloom starts out a creepy loser who has to steal to stay afloat, and days later becomes a monstrous go-getter that will stop at nothing in order to become the success story he has dreamed about. The story of Louis Bloom just might be the most unconventional rags to riches story we have seen.

Jake Gyllenhaal in "Nightcrawler"

Jake Gyllenhaal in “Nightcrawler”

Making his directorial debut, writer Dan Gilroy brilliantly serves up a slow-burning thriller that is consistently intriguing and cynical. Gilroy offers an adept commentary about the media’s exploitation of violence. He superbly captures the all too familiar nature of local news, and shows how far some might be willing to go in order to achieve his or her goals. It is parts black comedy mixed with horror. It will make you laugh and then moments later it will make you flinch and squirm in your seat. Gilroy also showcases his talent for style and flair. It is shot with such ease and calmness that Gilroy’s piercing execution emphatically puts you into a hypnotic daze. With his beautiful backdrops and vivid images contrasted with pulse-pounding car chases, black comedy, and Lou’s willingness to do anything, “Nightcrawler” just gets under your skin. The film stays with you long after you view it, and it will make you hold a mirror up to our society and its media. 

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